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Practicing While Injured Pt. 3

In today’s entry we will learn how an experienced instructor used her injuries as a chance to learn more about her body and grow off of the mat. Christince Vumai is a Yoga Alliance 200 E-RYT instructor who has been teaching yoga for the better half of the past decade. She is the owner of Ganesh Yoga Studio in Wichita, KS and she has certified a handful of instructors throughout the area. Let us hear about her journey.

      For me, injury is a tool to learn. I’ve been practicing yoga for over 12 years. In that time, I have had and recovered from 4 pregnancies, pulled hamstrings, dislocated pelvis, torn rotator cuffs, torn meniscus, and countless other minor injuries.

      In the beginning, I saw my first few injuries as a set-back. I would sulk and whine and do whatever I could to avoid anything that triggered pain. However, you can only avoid something so long before you finally have to confront it. The more I began to study what it meant to practice yoga beyond the physical body, the more I saw injury as an opportunity to dive deeper into myself, how I reacted or responded in times of difficulty. How I could change that response, and regain my sense of power in a seemingly powerless situation.

      I’ve used my injuries as an opportunity to learn about the human body. It’s one thing to learn about muscles from a text-book and by working out. It’s an entirely different scenario to feel that muscle in all of its glory. To explore what movements that muscle or joint is responsible for, to feel what it’s like when other muscles accommodate or compensate for the injury. To know where exactly that muscle attaches and if that bone is moved in a certain way, how does that muscle respond. It’s so sickeningly fascinating, much like my obsession with serial killer documentaries.

      We’re only in this body for a short time. And we practice yoga for an even shorter amount of time. Instead of seeing an injury as an automatic disqualifier, let it be a chance for you to learn what you’re made of. Literally and metaphorically. In today’s entry we will learn how an experienced instructor used her injuries as a chance to learn more about her body and grow off of the mat. Christince Vumai is a Yoga Alliance 200 E-RYT instructor who has been teaching yoga for the better half of the past decade. She is the owner of Ganesh Yoga Studio in Wichita, KS and she has certified a handful of instructors throughout the area. Let us hear about her journey,

      For me, injury is a tool to learn. I’ve been practicing yoga for over 12 years. In that time, I have had and recovered from 4 pregnancies, pulled hamstrings, dislocated pelvis, torn rotator cuffs, torn meniscus, and countless other minor injuries.

      In the beginning, I saw my first few injuries as a set-back. I would sulk and whine and do whatever I could to avoid anything that triggered pain. However, you can only avoid something so long before you finally have to confront it. The more I began to study what it meant to practice yoga beyond the physical body, the more I saw injury as an opportunity to dive deeper into myself, how I reacted or responded in times of difficulty. How I could change that response, and regain my sense of power in a seemingly powerless situation.

      I’ve used my injuries as an opportunity to learn about the human body. It’s one thing to learn about muscles from a text-book and by working out. It’s an entirely different scenario to feel that muscle in all of its glory. To explore what movements that muscle or joint is responsible for, to feel what it’s like when other muscles accommodate or compensate for the injury. To know where exactly that muscle attaches and if that bone is moved in a certain way, how does that muscle respond. It’s so sickeningly fascinating, much like my obsession with serial killer documentaries.

      We’re only in this body for a short time. And we practice yoga for an even shorter amount of time. Instead of seeing an injury as an automatic disqualifier, let it be a chance for you to learn what you’re made of. Literally and metaphorically. 

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